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Aberrant RPG - How could such a marketable game be so mismarketed?


Ruckus
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I am vaguely curious as to what brand of gothic crack is White Wolf smoking?

Its hard for me to believe that in a world in which a good portion of the top 50 comicbooks are populated by books like the Ultimates (and the Rest of the Ultimate line), Stormwatch, The Authority, Supreme Power etc. That a product line that specifically caters to and whose system makes allowances for a more realistic superhuman setting does not sell is absurd. Particularly taking into account the success of "four color" rpgs (Champions, Mutants and Masterminds, DC, etc).

Is it me or did White Wolf swing and miss on an easy pitch?

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Originally posted by Ruckus:
Is it me or did White Wolf swing and miss on an easy pitch?
In a word, yes. I'm sure there's a large number of reasons, but the biggest one, IMHO, is their alienation of the comic book crowd when the developers said "comic books are not an viable inspiration for Aberrant and stop being such immature mouth breathers who live in their parents' basement. Wrestling rules!"

Well, maybe not the second part, but that's my belief in a nutshell (damn my finals, I want to talk more about this).

And you're right: White Wolf, on the whole, always appears to be on some kind of gothic crack that makes them feel superior to everyone else.
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Thanks Singularity!

I don't think that White Wolfs crack use makes them think that they are superior to comic readers. I think their artiste pompastity is just a by product of thinking that 101 college classes in literature and philsophy makes them cool. You are quite correct in that blasting comic readers as not ready for this game is like walking up to a bunch of gothlings and saying that they are too gay for Vampire.

I think the crack smoking makes for spectacularly bad business decisions and is sending them down road as TSR. Rather then increase their stable of interesting games they will put out yet another edition of Homo: the Buggering. This from a company that explored new aspects of rpgs in its inception and allowed it to take TSR for a walk aroung the block.

In addition the crack allows them to then sell ignored properties to the d20 system as a supplement. Before i go further, I have nothing against the d20 system, it is not my favorite system, but it does what it does. However I do not think that it should be another version of Steve Jackson's BURPS (Banefully Unimaginative Role Playing System).

Furthermore the combination of the crack and their collegiate stupidity allows them to paint themselves further into a niche that has long past its expiration date.

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Hey, remember there are people who have made their living out of the technique of selling a product without giving people access to it...

,,
Quote:
Ruckus wrote:

In addition the crack allows them to then sell ignored properties to the d20 system as a supplement. Before i go further, I have nothing against the d20 system, it is not my favorite system, but it does what it does. However I do not think that it should be another version of Steve Jackson's BURPS (Banefully Unimaginative Role Playing System).

To be honest, I thought that most of the d20 adaptions were quite fantastic, actually. Adventure! d20 did an excellent job of mimicking the pulp feel (the general d20 mechanics are probably better at this than the somewhat grittier Storyteller mechanics). It's true, there are some concepts that could be done in Storyteller that can't really be done in d20, but on the whole, it's one of the most appropriate conversions I've ever seen.

And after a brief look through Trinity d20, again, Trinity's mood works exceptionally well with the new system, possibly better than with Storyteller.

d20 is not just for fantasy. The qualities of the system that make it good for high fantasy make it excellent for a lot of other genres as well, including pulp, including heroic Sci-Fi. I'll admit that I wasn't all that impressed with Aberrant d20 (Although it's an interesting game in it's own right, and I think the way they've reorganised the powers is spectacular, and definitely yoink-worthy), but people don't tend to give d20 a lot of credit.

Just as a note, I'm not a fan of d20 as a general rule - d20's general play style is not one I prefer as a general rule. That said, I do recognise that d20 is a pretty damn decent system.

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I think the number one problem with Aberrant is that it could never decide what exactly it wanted to be.

You have the designer telling you not to sully the game with guys in tights - and yet, there's guys in tights everywhere in the book. It prides itself on not being a superhero game yet the game's full of stuff that they obviously lifted from a comic (Matter Chameleon springs to mind.) You were told it was a 'realistic' take on superhumans in the real world, yet you have an archvillain in a CAPE broadcasting his manifesto live on TV.

The superhero aspects turned off White Wolf's normal customers who were looking for the latest version of Something: The Something Else, and the superhero roleplaying crowd was turned off by the undercurrent of hipper-than-thou that runs between each line of the game's text. (Which is a bloody shame, because superhero games have typically been very rules-heavy and the market was juuuuuust right for a rules-lite system like Storyteller to take on superfiction. Only the most diehard nerd cares about how fast Superman flies - most of us think it's just damn cool that he does in the first place.)

Then there were the factors totally beyond White Wolf's control - the non-generic nature of its system, in a genre used to systems that are as generic as possible. The comics slump in general at the time, with one of the shining stars being a comic that couldn't be any LESS like Aberrant if it tried (and ironically I think is the best 'widescreen action team book' ever written, putting the Authority to shame.) The gradual shift to hardcover and full-color, when it only partly had one trait locked in. The trend they even commented on in-game - the slow death of conspiracy-laden plots in fiction, trendy as hell at the time of writing and probably less so at the time of release.

I don't have sales figures for the d20 re-releases, but I can't imagine they're that good with the d20 bubble going *pop!* Systemwise it's tough to beat Mutants and Masterminds in the d20 superhero arena - and settingwise, well, it's still as schizo as ever. It's fine if you're like me and interpret it as a reality where there's a lot of everything - including straight-up superheroics, rock concerts in ultrasound, and international super-intrigue - going on, but that sort of thing takes some digging and isn't apparent at first glance. The main metaplot still revolves around a murder longtime fans solved years ago, and a conspiracy theory that is even more out of style now than it was in 1998.

At its core, superheroics rely on excitement - even if there are no villains to fight and the team's taking a Miracleman-esque approach to solving the world's problems, it should still be exciting to BE a superhuman. I would rather part the waters of Venice by running on them than negotiate a contract with Nike. I would rather toss a tank into outer space than appear on Regis & Kathy Lee. I would prefer to bounce bullets off my chest instead of drinking nova cocktails in Nova Techno Rave Club #146. I would sooner stop the death of thousands of people than investigate the murder of one person.

When the genre you're obviously emulating even as you disparage it is known for high adventure, high stakes, and holy-CRAP-that-was-cool moments... and your game goes out of the way to mimimize that... don't be surprised if it turns out unpopular. Because as far reaching and versatile as superfiction can be, the popular books are and always will be about the good guys kicking some ass.

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  • 1 month later...

It's totally cuz they cater to the goth kids. Look at all their gaymes. Even Exalted, which was a totally cool game... they went goth witht hat crap too. And they had a good thing going with changeling too. They put a bit of a goth spin on that one, but it was subtle. But I guess people who dig spandex and lycra generally arent the black and purple crushed velvet type of gamer.

on a side note. The thing I liked about White wolf... The games are interchangeable. I play Longboard in an alternate universe displaced by DIvis Mal in the exalted world. its pretty cool.

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I think blaming the Goth thing is kind of out of hand. If they were only catering to the Goth folks then why did they make Trinity, Aberrant, and Adventure? I know a lot of people who play Vampire that I would NOT call goth. It's roleplaying....the Goth stereotype is just a "in-house" stereotype for us roleplayers. Sometimes it's true, sometimes it's not.

My friend Ryan was an Editor for Exalted..he still talks about trying to find all the hidden Goths White Wolf has working for them (to no avail).

Why didn't Aberrant do well? I suggest it has something to do with the game's theme. Which is, what, conspiracies? All the pictures and descriptions tell of action packed comic book adventures (people have already said this) and we're told that's NOT part of the game.

I commend the books' take on human sexuality and homosexuality...but in some ways that gets taken too far. Aberrant is a comic-book game that has a lot of adult-themed conspiracies in it.

Oh and the Author's comment about how great it must be to be Tommy Orgy haunts me somehow. Still, you have to respect a game that talks about how some people "really go" for Hermaphrodites.

I'm just ranting. Pay no attention to me.

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I would disagree that Aberrant couldn't decide what it was, but, I would say that what Aberrant was didn't spark a fire because it wasn't firmly in one camp or another. It did not want to be the ST version of Marvel or DC's games. 4 Color style was clearly downplayed with those occurences of it presented as a "real world" emulation of what was seen in the comic books. Basically people copying one of the few archetypes available for them that covered folks flying through the air and lifting up cars.

The game design was over the top on characters not making a difference. Each of the pre-packaged adventures created had the characters as obvious second or third stringers in the world. They go so far as to present a group of adversaries that while slightly buff weren't anything remarkable and flat out say that it's unlikely any group of PCs should be able to defeat them due to the merc inhuman power. It's like each and ever adventure was designed for a newly erupted 30 NP character.

The over the top use of conspiracies also made for an atmosphere that didn't encourage any other type of gameplay. Now, while I do not think that the Aberrant world is your basic 4 color paradise you should be able to play that if that is what your troupe wants to play. But everything out of the company encourages intrigue and mystery over anything else. Proteus, the Terat Politics, Aberrants hiding from the man, Directive Agents that are flat out assumed to be outpowered by everything around them, all of this is for someone to whom political struggle is bread and butter. Anyone else is left out in the cold.

And finally, I don't think enough can be said about lack of advertising. They were trying to poach their own reserve by restricting most of their advertising to in house publications. But c'mon, their fan base had already invested heavily in WoD, asking them to start shelling out of a new game that was light years away from what they have expressed interest in is a little much to ask. What about advertising in comic books or comic book magazines? I collected Marvel, DC and indeps when Aberrant first came out, I read Wizard on a monthly basis and I never heard of the game until someone introduced me to it at a con and he worked in a gaming shop.

That's my take on it at least.

Oh, and sorry, just cannot not mention this bit: If you want to get people into your game, even if it's "rules lite" like ST is, how about you make a little effort at editing and cross checking what is in the books so that there aren't holes the size of Jupiter available to people for exploitation. Infering that the people who play your games "don't play like that, or at least shouldn't" is asinine and lazy.

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"This is not Superfriends."

the disclaimer on the inside of the book. And yeah the prepackaged adventures totally sucked. Perhaps my group was just awesomely blessed with a dope storyteller. When you got a group of people togethr to play a game nad everyone wanted to play something different. He was able to tweak all the games into one so we all could play the type of character we all wanted to play.

Aberrant doesnt sell well, because it is a NICHE game. RPGs by and large sell better and are more popular on the whole medievel deal. White wolf created its own niche witht he vampire/hunter/werewolf games. To totally dimiss the idea of the goth thing not making a difference is absurd to me. Goth not in the true sense of the word, but goth in the way that those who play the game are generally people who read the Anne rice books. I know many people who are not goth but love vamps. Man, theres a dude that wears his clan symbol pinned on the INSIDE of his Army Class A uniform. I dont mean these people look Goth. I mean White wolf totally writes for that type of world.

PS_-pre-packaged adventures blow

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Quote:
The game design was over the top on characters not making a difference. Each of the pre-packaged adventures created had the characters as obvious second or third stringers in the world.
True for some adventures, less so for others.

Gabby’s attempt to bring about the end of the world through disease was pretty high stakes and something the PCs could deal with.
Novas as a natural disaster, the PCs get to save/doom various baselines and novas.

Even in the Pax vs. Mal thing, with both of them doing their thing Corbin could be killed/saved/freed.
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I can't play Dungeons & Dragons. Saying that White Wolf Created a Niche for themselves is true, but the Market has Thousands of games that don't take place in Tolkien Designed world and well, those I can really get into.

Exalted is kind of an interesting twist on that...which is why it's the closest I've ever played to the D&D stuff.

My criticism would be the need to put Allegiance on your character sheet. In a game of conspiracies and what not, once you knew about them there's always someone in the troope that wants to take the party on a meta-game mini-adventure. At least in Vampire the secrets were obscure and didn't affect everyone or were too ancient to come up in everyday gaming life.

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Quote:
Originally posted by Longboard:
Aberrant doesnt sell well, because it is a NICHE game. RPGs by and large sell better and are more popular on the whole medievel deal.
Well... Vampire: The Masquerade is firmly Modern-Day, and is the one of the highest-selling games today. I suspect that while the Fantasy games have been selling well, the genre's expanded so much, comparing two games can be like comparing Apples and Oranges. Vampire is a totally different game to D&D, both of which are entirely different to Nobilis, which in turn is incredibly different to Exalted. These are all fantasy games (whether Medieval or Modern), but not really comparable.


Quote:
White wolf created its own niche witht he vampire/hunter/werewolf games. To totally dimiss the idea of the goth thing not making a difference is absurd to me.
In that case, why is Adventure! such a high-selling system of White Wolf? (Maybe not high enough to activate supplements, but if I recall, it still did quite well). The only angst visible in that setting is Dr. Primoris, and even then, it's not goth-angst, it's pulp-angst. It's also not medieval fantasy. It's just Hope incarnate.

Also, Note that when Trinity was first released, there were attackers who kept crying "VAMPIRE IN SPACE!!!". As it turned out, Trinity became far more. Maybe not the best setting they ever came out with, but the angst was minimal, the secrets not thrown into your face, and there was plenty around to use. And, in it's own way, worked hard to embody Unity.

Exalted also has less Angst. Exalted is literally a game of Gods, or at least being a weapon of them. You're supposed to be changing the world, that's what the Exalted do. There's no angsty goth shit, unless you want to be an Abyssal, and even then, it's not essential, merely inferred.

So, frankly, I don't believe you. White Wolf's World of Darkness series did not necessarily have that much of an impact on Aberrant. What I suspect is the case is that Aberrant was a game of Sacrifice, and I suspect the influence is just a little too pervasive within the game. Sacrifice is all well and good, but the heavy-handedness of it just gets to you after a while...


Quote:
PS_-pre-packaged adventures blow
There were a few that had potential, I'm not going to say they all blow. One of the main issues is that, especially in the first set, they were trying to make a range of modules that showcased the kind of stories they thought the setting was capable of making. I think they did a good job, even if the adventures themselves weren't off the highest quality.

And as a note, try reading one of the Nobilis pre-set adventures, either the LARP one or the one in the book - pre-packaged does not mean suckitude, by a long shot...
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That is the greatest strength of the game. The ability for the Storyteller to fold the system into something that works.

Longboard, don't sell the rest of your group short. Most certainly, the willingness of the players to make the game work was part of that magic. It is often as much a Troupe-style game as a Storyteller game.

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I didnt mean it like that. We had a strong group of role players. most who like myself have been playing RPGs since D&D's 1st edition. plus we were all writers, and journalists and crap. we also had a rather large group. It was awesome. Im not saying my group was crappy and the stroyteller owned, Im saying it was a very Excellent group of players and together it made for excellent gaming sessions

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It amuses me that more copies of Palladium's Heroes Unlimited sell than Aberrant here in Germany. Of course they don't sell Aberrant here much anymore. On the other hand, I've never seen so many Trinity books still on the Prime Shelves as here in Berlin.

Despite Heroes Unlimited sucking sack, you have to respect a game that lets the players pick the theme. Too many of White Wolf's games have an Auto-theme that's hard to escape if you want to run a different style (because the "theme" is designed into the game).

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BIll, I got all my books from a place called the Heidelbar in Heidelberg. also, I think the place was called fantasy forest??? in Mannheim. but gaming for Aberrant was tough to find. although all youre miniature games were everywhere. I lived in Heidelberg for like... almost five years

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  • 3 weeks later...

The only thing I can think of that sank Aberrant as a product line would be the perception by many "traditional superpower" gamers that the characters are doomed to become monsters via Taint. Whether we like it or not, the largest segment of the superpower roleplaying base is the "four-color" group, and the authors of Aberrant did everything in their power to insult and exclude said group...which is a shame, because Aberrant works just as well for that as it does for its intended setting.

In other words, White Wolf took an incredibly flexible superpower game system and marketted it narrowly as another angst-fest...missing the point that the bulk of the angst-loving gamers were already happily playing Vampire and Werewolf and weren't likely to switch out for a superpower system.

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Yes, Ashnod, and I'm of much the same mind; the other systems (Champions, Marvel, etc) appeal to me not in the least, and at least part of that is the 4-colorness of them. That said:

1. We're in the minority...a small enough minority to not keep the game viable for marketting and development.

2. White Wolf didn't just not market it as a 4-color; they went out of their way to make bloody well sure that they didn't intend Aberrant it for 4-color, that they didn't like 4-color, and that using Aberrant for 4-color would be vile and wrong. It was not a good pose to strike in front of the power base of the hobby. Had White Wolf dropped the condescending sidebars and snide cracks -- and perhaps even swallowed their pride enough to offer a brief option, just a one-page sketch, to use the system in a somewhat less doomed setting -- Aberrant likely would have sold a lot better (and then still get canned by White Wolf because of a deep lack of angst, but such is life).

3. After all of the anti-4-color spite, White Wolf then (in a giant act of hypocrisy) resorted to 4-color-style art on the cover of the main book and as a major percentage of the internal art. Had someone not pointed out to me the system, I would have passed it over on the shelf as another superpower smash-em-up RPG.

What it boils down to is that White Wolf forgot the cardinal rule of RPGs -- that gamers, not writers, determine what they will play -- and ultimately suffered the death of the product line (twice, considering that d20 Aberrant is, for all intents and purposes, developmentally dead).

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Oh man, we played our games in a 4 color world. I hated "champions", and all the other gaming systems. The thing about white wolf will always be the use exclusively of d10. All their games meld well together.

It also doesnt help when the game didnt have the requisite black and purple crushed velvet.

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I actually liked the "This is not the Superfriends" speech and tried to explain to my players that this was not 'just' a superhero game. They wouldn't buy it. They just pointed at the art-work and laughed away. I got one of them to actually read 40 or so pages, and he got quite excited. However, the other two couldn't get past the 'superhero' aspect of the game.

The more you read about Aberrant, the less comic-like it becomes IMHO. However, the art-work especially keeps conjuring up these images of men in tights fighting the evil of the world.

Either make it a comic/superhero game, or don't.

- Azulthar

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make it whatever you want. The character lOngboard is a kid. his only exposure to "Superheroes" are through comic books. The fact that some characters like stone badass dont play in a comic book world or have a comic book attitude make it fun to play a very annoying young charcter whot ruly believes he is writing a comic book. like what wild bill cody would ahve been thinking as he was living in a world where they wrote dime store novles about him. some tru some not. The best part about role-playing games is you make it what you want. I play a charcter that believes he's a super hero., ewveryone else plays characters that dont wear eufuber, or spandex, but regular street clothes and act like they are not super heroes. LOng board thrives off of the whole idea of being a superhero

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That's pretty much the point. Aberrant is an outstanding base for pretty much any super-powered game you care to run; but WW, in their infinite wisdom, devoted boxed-text to pretty much demanding that the system not be used for "four-color"...and then slapped comic-book art all over it -- in effect, they managed to alienate pretty much everyone. Combined with what amounted to a complete lack of publicity, haphazard quality assurance, and a crazy quilt of supplement scheduling, and WW effectively put a pistol to Aberrant's head and pulled the trigger.

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Here's what I noticed with abberant. While it was created to be the bridge between Modern times and Trinity, and the middle part of the Trinity trilogy, Aberrant had the inklings, albeit a few, of going on it's own. As if the Writers, and Editors, were trying to Make Aberrant it's own world.

Unlike the laser-like focus of the WoD lines, which had a beginning, middle, and recently an end, Aberrant, while being the Trinityverse's middle, almost was the rebellious middle child of the series.

Aberrant suffered from lack of direction, lack of purpose, and an assumed middle of the story situation, when all they did to explain away the differences between Aberrant and Trinity is that Earth was almost blown back to the stone age (or did) and it had recovered since the Aberrant War.

Yet how did Humanity recover so quickly to become a spacefaring race, and why are the Aberrants in Trinity SO more different than Novas?

And why are the Psiads having it so easy?

You just can't market a game that is so... miswritten.

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I do agree that the presentation of canon (which I love for the most part) was foul.

"This happened. That happened. This is gospel. But how did they happen? Oh, well that is us giving you freedom. I mean, we wouldn't want to force anything on you now would we? Except for the fact that you suck compared to canon NPCs. And that folks ten thousand times smarter than anyone else shouldn't be able to really impact science, except when we have NPCs do it. Oh, and this is a serious game with serious meaning to it. Except for a bunch of drugged-out, murderous satan worshippers who have their own Opsite."

Yeah.

Oh, and I will respectfully disagree that the platform is well designed. The weaknesses/strengths and extras system is for shit and too many powers are visciously unbalanced. But, nothing that a little editing or a 2nd edition wouldn't have solved.

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I think they just tried to make a book that explained how the Aberrants of Trinity came to be. Im my honest opinion, they failed miserably. They created something else, and have us be led my the nose HARD to Trinity. We don't stop and smell the roses, we just go. There's no real dealing with it. It all happens around you, and you don't matter for anything. You're just that node juice Totentanz, Mal, or Pax scrape off of their boots at the end of the day.

At least here at N! Prime we're sorta part of the Canon without being in it.

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You don't necessarily matter in the "canon" story, but how many games actually pay attention to canon to such a degree that the characters mean nothing?

Most ST's give their characters the freedom to affect the world in a way that is dramatic and powerful. Let's be honest, how many years early would the Aberrant War be if we took our characters' TT actions into account?

Prodigy killing how many? Long nuking a city with a single blast of quantum?

Simple fact of the matter: whenever you have a canon "metaplot" the characters always SEEM insignificant in comparison. It's not the fault of the module designers if your game sticks so close to canon that your PC's seem small.

You and your ST have the power to change whatever it is that you want about a game before it happens, and in downtime between games when you decide where you want the story to go. You decide the level of involvement the canon world has on your story.

Complaining about the metaplot, which HAS to be independent of the characters simply for the sake of writing the fool thing (can you imagine reading a timeline in a book that says 2031: (Insert name of PC Cell here) levels half of London, causing massive response from the Directive) is silly.

You play in the LotR world and keep to canon? Well, sorry, unless you're part of the main cast you're in the background, unless things are changed. You play in the Buffy world and keep to canon? Same thing.

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Hehehe...not only did I like the "No Superfriends" speech, I liked the way White Wolf handled the metaplot as well smile

You shouldn't be too hard on White Wolf...they created the Trinity Universe after all, nobody forced them. It was their creativity and desire to make a good game (and good money) that brought us Aberrant, and I don't think they're happy with its failure either.

RP-companies always get a +1 respect from me, it's not like they're in it for the money...if they were, they could do a hell of a lot better than being a RP-publisher.

- Azulthar

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Juri, here is the interesting thing.

Who wants to play a game where their character means nothing, and that no matter what they do things go by what the book says?

And Azulthar, you'd give props to a company that half-assed it's product just because they had a seperate product (World of Darkness) that actually had legs in their mind.

You know something, it's my honest opinion, and an honest assumption, that they didn't intend on making Aberrant and Adventure! to be part of the Trinity line. Infact, I think Aberrant and Adventure were afterthoughts in their mind. They probably only intended Trinity.

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White Wolf cared about Aberrant, period. You can't argue this any other way. They've spent months of writing on Aberrant and made some big investments in order to produce it. Most likely not nearly as much as they did on the World of Darkness, because they had no idea of how Aberrant might sell and because they thought it unlikely of becoming as popular as the WoD (which it couldn't have been even with the best of marketing). But they still thought it could be a success because otherwise they wouldn't even have produced it.

And apart from the financial picture, I'm very hard-pressed to believe that the writers didn't care for their own creative offspring.

So perhaps their approach was wrong, perhaps they should have marketed/designed the game better...it most certainly wasn't intentional, and White Wolf has paid the most for their mistake.

- Azulthar

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Quote:
White Wolf cared about Aberrant, period.
Methinks that you are extrapolating from the writers to the entire company, and that you are making a mistake by doing so.

I'd say that the writers of Aberrant cared about Aberrant, but that said caring on the part of the Aberrant editors is questionable at best, that the artists apparently thought they were doing a comic book and quite possibly had never seen any of the text for Aberrant, and that the corporate minds at White Wolf -- the company that routinely sold poorly-edited first editions of every game they ever released -- cared only if it sold like hotcakes (which it didn't, due largely to the factors listed in this thread).

Had it sold better, it's possible that White Wolf would have developed caring for Aberrant -- "caring" being defined, in White Wolf terms, as a fully-edited and quality-controlled second edition for everyone to go buy. As it was, they were willing to go no farther than to wring what they could out of it through a series of supplements that largely read as if they were written in stream-of-consciousness fashion, and then tossing the whole thing in the trash once they figured that it was spent in its current form (with a brief -- and cheap -- one-shot "revival" through a positively dreadful d20 port of the game).
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  • 4 months later...

Back to the topic. How could this game be mismarketed? White Wolf's 1st editions always have a lot of bugs. If the game and supplements sell well anyways, they rework it to pull in a larger audience. Unfortunately, they misjudged the market with Aberrant. They developed a game that they felt would appeal to both their core WoD audience and superhero game fans looking for something different. BUT...the artwork had a four-color feel to it. That first impression was the exact opposite of White Wolf's intent.

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I'll defer to what I said above. The introduction in the Aberrant Player's Guide felt like a rude slap in the face, like the developers were saying I was some kind of immature child for enjoying comics and for daring to even think about comics within a minute of thinking about Aberrant. For me, that introduction was the culmination of a feeling of resentment I got from the developers of the product regarding how their audience had the "idiotic gall" to equate comics with Aberrant.

Obviously I'm a little bitter about this, but the attitude the developers approach the interaction between comics and Aberrant simply escapes reasoning and general principles of marketing. I could chalk it up to the classic White Wolf elitism but somehow I think that doesn't properly capture the situation.

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