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Aurelius

Aberrant: Infinite Earth - Cosmos Nova - Impact

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Excerpts from news broadcasts aired over much of North America, Nov 23rd, 2013:

…have confirmation from NORAD, as well as from numerous scientific observers, that the events in the Alaskan North Slope region were in fact due to a meteorite impact, and were not caused by an ICBM – or Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile – possibly launched from North Korea, as was initially presumed by some to be the case! From what we’re being told, at 2:36 in the morning, local Alaskan time, the meteorite entered earth’s atmosphere and impacted in the remote North Slope region of Alaska, a few miles east of the Kaolak River. Viewers may recall the similar event that occurred earlier this year when a meteor detonated over the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia’s Ural region in February, or the one that exploded over Baja San Lucas, Mexico five years ago in 2008. However the impact in Alaska is different than either of those two events, because in this case the object actually struck the earth, rather than detonating in what’s called an “air burst” before impact – which is the fundamental difference between a “meteor” and a “meteorite”…

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…now appears that the Kaolak meteorite collided with Sirius Satellite Radio’s Radiosat 3 – one of three satellites that the company owns and operates in highly inclined orbits over the earth’s northern hemisphere in what are known as “tundra orbits.” The collision occurred approximately eight minutes before the meteorite impacted with the earth, destroying the satellite in the process and causing significant loss of coverage for many users of Sirius’ satellite radio broadcasting network in parts of the Northwest region of the country. There are controversial reports coming in that this collision altered the meteorite’s course, and that it would not otherwise have struck the earth at all, but some experts deny that this could be the case because, they say, in order for the Kaolak meteorite to have survived atmospheric entry at the speed it was travelling – which estimates state was around 50 times the speed of sound – and to have struck the earth with enough force to generate the kind of devastation it caused, rather than vaporizing in an air burst like the Chelyabinsk meteor, the Kaolak meteorite would have to have had a mass of at least ten trillion tons or more which, those experts say, is far too large for it to have been knocked off course by something as relatively tiny as a communications satellite…

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…force of the impact threw up a huge dust cloud that currently reaches kilometers into the air, as well as setting off a magnitude 9 earthquake that was felt by Alaskan residents living as much as 200 miles away from the impact site. Fortunately, the remote and sparsely populated region in which the meteorite struck has led to there being no reported deaths as yet, and only a few dozen reported injuries at this time, though damage to infrastructure in villages located within a 100 mile radius of the impact is reportedly significant. Experts are saying that the low incidence of injuries, and the lack of any reported deaths so far, is extremely lucky, as this is the largest recorded earthquake in the region since the Anchorage earthquake of 1964…

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THE PRESENT

Date & Time: November 23rd, 2013, 11:41pm

Location: Kaolak meteorite impact crater, approximately 3.75 miles east of Kaolak River, Alaska

Coordinates (GPS): N 69 55.146, W 159 55.888

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Jimmy Smalls, Major in the United States Air Force, pulled up his collar and hunched his way further into his artic-rated coat as he leaned into the wind kicked up by the helicopter currently coming to rest fifteen or twenty meters away. The helicopter landed, and a moment later disgorged one of its occupants, who made his way to Smalls in the typical crouching-jog that people tend to use around helicopters. By the time the man had reached Smalls and was straightening out of his crouch the helicopter was already several meters in the air again and still rising.

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Major Smalls saluted at the man’s approach and, once he was within earshot, half-shouted in formal greeting, “General!”

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Brigadier General Tom Ballard returned a hurried and cursory salute without once breaking his stride, forcing Smalls to fall into step beside him or be left quickly behind. “Where is it?” the general asked, his brow furrowed and his eyes asquint as he peered into the arctic night around them, searching for the reason he’d flown all the way out here.

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“Over this way”, answered the major, pointing off to their right, beyond the hastily assembled land-moving equipment and even more hastily assembled command tent.

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They were more than a hundred miles from the nearest settlement large enough to be called a town – and much further away from the nearest actual city – in the middle of one of the remotest and most poorly mapped regions of Alaska’s North Slope region. Even during Alaska’s summer months travelling there would have been difficult, but in the middle of the Alaskan winter getting all of the equipment and personnel out there that they had, and getting them there as quickly as they had, was the kind of feat that only the United States Air Force could have pulled off. It was the middle of the night, but because they were so far north even if it had been daytime it would still have been dark, and there were high-intensity lights set up on poles at regular intervals throughout the makeshift camp, with a larger concentration of light set up around what the general assumed to be the actual point of impact. The temperature was well below freezing; there was hardly any snow at all, however, which Ballard thought strange until he remembered that he was standing in the middle of a recently formed impact crater.

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General Ballard could see that the tractors and other earth-moving equipment had been busy, hauling away piled up debris from the central cone of the impact crater, forcing them to climb over and weave their way between a few different piles of recently moved rubble. He’d seen the crater’s central cone clearly from the air as he’d ridden in on the helicopter, but from down here on the ground it looked more like a small hill or large mound. Ballard had always found it strange that impact craters like this one often had these raised cones smack in the middle of them. He knew there was a scientific explanation for it, but couldn’t pretend to know what it might be.

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As they walked the general spared a glance in Major Smalls’ direction. “Give me your report, major. What’ve you got so far?”

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“Yes sir”, answered Smalls. Taking a breath, he dove into his report, “the object would no doubt have warranted an investigation of some kind in any case, but several anomalous events before and during its descent and impact attracted our notice and sparked the ongoing operation you see going on around you.”

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“Anomalous events?” asked the General. “Such as?”

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“The way the object changed course after it collided with the Radiosat 3 satellite, for one. At its mass and velocity, a collision with a satellite shouldn’t have had any notable impact on its course or bearing, yet it did. Additionally, there was the relatively small release of energy in the form of light or heat during the objects descent – significantly less than there should have been. Most of what was released was generated by the actual impact itself. Also, sir, the object slowed down significantly during its descent – down to around Mach 53 at the time of impact – much more so than can be accounted for by atmospheric drag. Especially considering the object’s actual size.”

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Ballard cast a questioning glance in Smalls’ direction and asked, “Size? How big is it?”

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“Much smaller than it should be, sir”, Smalls said. “You’ll have to see for yourself to really understand.”

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They were nearing the actual point of impact as Smalls said this, so the general let the major's non-answer slide and allowed himself to be led to ‘the object’.

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They crested the lip of the central cone and Ballard immediately found himself being led down into another, much smaller crater that lay inside of it. In the lowest portion of this inner crater’s basin was a crowd of personnel and equipment; as he and Smalls approached, some of the men turned and, seeing Ballard, stiffened in salute. The rest of those gathered quickly noticed this and turned to offer salutes of their own, standing to one side to allow the general access to whatever lay at the center. As the crowd of soldiers and workers cleared away Ballard finally caught site of Lieutenant Colonel Darnell Flowers, his officer in charge out here at the crater site, squatting over something practically at the dead center of it all.

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The colonel turned and, seeing Ballard, stood to offer him a salute as well. The general returned it and said, “The major tells me there’s something here I need to ‘see for myself to really understand.’”

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“He’s right, general”, Flowers told him. The officer stood to one side and gestured for the general to look into a recently-excavated pit that opened just behind him.

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Ballard took a step forward and peered down into the pit. Lights were pouring into it from high-powered lamps, so the darkness wasn’t a problem, but the general was still having trouble working out what he was seeing. After a moment he turned back to Flowers with a curious look on his face.

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“Is that a… a statue?”, he asked.

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